Why I’m Getting to Work this October 10th

Food & climate change article written on the 22 Sep 2010

I have a confession to make. I have probably signed more online petitions than I have had hot dinners.

Ever since I was living in San Francisco and saw modeling of sea level rise that would wipe out San Francisco Airport, meaning I’d never get home to Australia again I have been scared of what climate change means, and not just for SF, but more scarily, for Mumbai and Bangladesh. And it’s not just theoretical, ‘pie in the sky’, ‘maybe one day’ sea level rise, but the impacts we feel here and now. The fine balance of the system is already out of whack.

So I have gotten involved in all kinds of actions and activism from calling politicians offices, to painting banners, dancing on the streets at rallies, trying in vain to convert my grandparents and yes, signing online petitions.

Now its time to roll up our sleeves and instead of asking politicians who so far, in this country have scored a massive FAIL on climate action, we are leading by example.

This October 10th, there will be people all over the country working hard to reduce the impact they are having on our environment. From riding bikes to their place of worship, planting wildlife corridors, installing solar panels or wind turbines, bit by bit the people of Australia are changing the way this country works.

The Global Work Parties will be happening in almost every country on the globe, this is an amazing opportunity to be part of something truly global. From sumo wrestlers cycling to training to a Palestine-Jordan-Israel bike ride, this day is so much bigger than the sum of its parts.

Not only will we make a tangible difference, we are leading our leaders. Normally things with dirt and heavy lifting are not my scene, but if that is what it takes to solve the climate crisis, then I am ready to get to work.

What you can do:

Emily Mulligan is the Australian Coordinator for 350.org

First published on A Climate For Change