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Make a tax-deductible donation before June 30 to help families facing climate-fuelled disasters

Warming waters, landslides, floods and other disasters are exacerbating poverty and deepening inequality 

Antonnie is part of the Molpoe community in Vanuatu, who have seen firsthand the destructive consequences of the climate crisis. He can still recall the evening the landslide struck and swept everything away.  

“Our village was covered in dust that fell on us. We panicked and scattered. One person ran … If he had turned, the ground would have buried him …  I took my mother, my children, my wife, and a young boy … and we moved.”  

To this day, if the children hear thunder rumble, they will run. They still fear the sound of the landslide.

– Antonnie, Vanuatu

Antonnie’s family made it to safety. Then, just as his community began to rebuild, a cyclone tore through and destroyed what remained. Antonnie’s family lost their home, their water source, and their farmland — the land they used to make a living.  

Because of the climate crisis, extreme weather events are going to become more frequent and more dangerous. And they threaten to push communities deeper into poverty. That’s where you come in. 

By donating today, you can help communities like Antonnie’s to recover, rebuild and be ready for a future impacted by the climate crisis.  

Will you make a tax-deductible donation before 30 June?  

How your tax-deductible donation can help

Your tax-deductible donation will be used to support Oxfam’s efforts around the world. Your gift can help communities:

Molpoe, Vanuatu: Pamela, Antonnie and Roy prepare a local meal. Their home, Molpoe village in Vanuatu, was hit by a devastating landslide caused by torrential rain, which has become more frequent due to extreme weather. Photo:Ivan Utahenua/Oxfam

$75 can help recovery

Provide cash assistance for families to help them recover when extreme weather strikes 

Molpoe, Vanuatu: In 2022, the village of Molpoe in Vanuatu was hit by a devastating landslide caused by torrential rain, which has become more frequent due to extreme weather. Photo: Ivan Utahenua/Oxfam

$185 can help rebuild

Help people build new homes in safe places, so they can continue to live in the landscape they know and love  

Mekko, Indonesia: Said (33) in front of his Kangkong plantation, which he has planted to adapt to climate change and the reduction of fish stock in the ocean. Photo: Vikram Sombu/Oxfam

$300 can help people be ready

Provide seeds, tools and training to give communities a new approach to sourcing food and trading

Warming waters, landslides and floods are claiming livelihoods, homes and even lives

Donate before June 30 to help communities to adapt their livelihoods and avoid being driven deeper into poverty.

MAKE A TAX-DEDUTIBLE DONATION

Our Pacific neighbours can no longer wait

Mekko, Indonesia: Marlina (34) harvests kale from the plantation garden in front of her home. She and her husband, Said, have turned to gardening to be able to feed their family, having to adapt to climate change and the reduction of fish stock in the ocean. Photo: Vikram Sombu/Oxfam

Marlina, Indonesia

“We sold them [fish] in the traditional market … Well, it’s difficult to sell fish these days. Like, days before, we only sell one or two bundles of fish. Our sustenance comes from fish, when there’s fish we can eat and drink. What if there is no fish?” 

Molpoe, Vanuatu: Roy lives in the village of Molpoe in Vanuatu. In 2022, Molpoe was hit by a devastating landslide caused by torrential rain, which has become more frequent due to extreme weather. Photo: Ivan Utahenua/Oxfam

Roy, Vanuatu

“In the times before, we lived a normal life and everyone was happy … But after the landslide took our home, we lived in sorrow and we lost everything. The ground buried our taro gardens, we lost the trees we use for building houses. The ground buried everything.” 

Mekko, Indonesia: Said (33) stands in front of his fishing boat. He now struggles to catch enough fish for his family's daily needs, due to climate change and the fish moving further and further out to sea. Photo: Vikram Sombu/Oxfam. Oxfam acknowledges the support of the Australian Government through the Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP)

Said, Indonesia  

“If we don’t sail today, what can we eat? What should we eat?”

Climate change is worsening poverty

Remote communities are hit hardest by climate change, while being the least responsible

Communities like Tasman’s are being hit the hardest by climate change, despite Indonesia being one of 100 countries that contribute just 3% of emissions. Will you donate before June 30 to help?

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