Factory X commit to pay a living wage

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After years of campaigning from Oxfam supporters, Factory X commit to pay a living wage

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Best&Less published their supplier lists

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Best&Less have published 100% of their Tier 1 supplier lists, bringing their factories out of hiding and ensuring their supply chain is transparent. 

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Garment makers with their families

David Jones and Country Road support worker safety

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Country Road Group and David Jones made a big step forward on factory safety by joining the important Bangladesh Fire & Building Safety Accord. 

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Elk steps towards a fairer fashion industry

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Melbourne-based fashion label ELK have made a real commitment to ensuring workers in their supply chain are paid a living wage.  

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Cotton On cotton on to living wages

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Cotton On has just announced they are strengthening their commitment to a living wage! Congratulations, Cotton On.

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Kmart and Target take a big step forward on living wages!

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To celebrate, comedian Sammy J recorded a special thank you message to congratulate them. Watch the video.

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City Chic: a huge step toward a living wage

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City Chic was the first Australian brand to make a real commitment to a living wage. 

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Sammy J holding a sign that says "Pay a living wage"

Sammy J says: Dear Kmart, Increase What She Makes

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Sammy J speaks for a lot of us – when we’re shopping, we all love a bargain. But, the bargain shouldn’t be what she makes.

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What She Makes Game

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Try out this classroom round table role play/ debate game!

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Just Group: A big win for worker safety

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After five years of campaigning, the Just Group that owns Just Jeans and Peter Alexander has come to the party on worker safety and joined the Bangladesh Fire & Building Safety Accord. This is a big win for worker safety. Congratulations to Just Group for making a great first move. The next step is to bring their factory […]

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Cotton On joins ACT Initiative

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Cotton On made important progress by joining the ACT Initiative on Living Wages, which brings together brands and global unions to collaborate on achieving higher wages for the women who make our clothes. Cotton On also affirmed their commitment to working towards living wages in their supply chain, however are yet to commit to a […]

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A woman works on a clothing line for an international brand in Dong Nai province, Vietnam. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam

Gorman take a step forward on transparency

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After years of campaigning from Oxfam supporters, Gorman and Factory X have published the names and locations of their factories. It’s an important step forward in supply chain transparency. Without this information it is extremely difficult to confirm whether workers are being treated fairly, and it allows workers to raise their concerns directly with the […]

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Photo: GMB Akash/Panos/OxfamAUS

Help school the big brands this summer

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You know the holidays are over when you starting seeing advertisements for ‘Back To School’ sales. Unfortunately, many of the women making clothes for brands like Kmart, Target and Big W are paid poverty wages. Find out how you can call brands to account.

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You won’t believe What She Makes

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Together, we’re tackling poverty in the fashion industry, demanding big clothing brands pay a living wage to the women who make our clothes.

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Aussie fashion brands: what’s with transparency?

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This year, the focus of our ‘Naughty or Nice’ list is transparency. But we know transparency in itself doesn’t automatically equal fair treatment of workers, so why are we using it?

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Be fashion forward this weekend (and beyond)

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To be ‘fashion forward’ is to be ahead of the curve: not just in terms of design and materials, but more importantly, around how your clothes are made. Find out which companies are moving towards a fairer future, and which companies are trying hide their tracks.

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A woman works on a Rip Curl Jacket in North Korea

Rip Curl on the search for transparency

A recent Fairfax Media report has indicated Rip Curl clothing was produced under harsh working conditions in North Korea. There is no excuse for any company to be unaware of what is happening in its own supply chain. Now is the time for Rip Curl to improve its transparency and support workers’ rights.

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Sumi Abedin pictured outside the Just Jeans store in Bourke St, Melbourne. Although severely injured, Sumi survived the Tazreen garment factory fire in Bangladesh by jumping from the third floor; she was in Australia last year highlighting the poor working conditions still faced by many Bangladeshi garment factory workers.

Naughty or Nice: The Aussie brands dodging workers’ rights

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Two years ago Oxfam released its first “Naughty or Nice” list. We outed the brands who refused to protect their workers rights and applauded the ones who did. Now, in 2015, what’s changed? Who still won’t sign the Accord? And how do you demand more for the people that make your clothes?

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Pay to Work: Corrupt practices cause mounting frustration

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The other morning I spoke with some villagers who live in the district surrounding the Ching Luh factory. They told me about a local hustler who promotes factory recruitment. Potential applicants are asked for money ranging from 2-2.5 million rupiah (equivalent to two months of a factory workers’ full time wage). The hustler demanded upfront […]

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Photo: Nicola Bailey/ActionAid

The good news and the bad news for garment workers in Bangladesh

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Bangladesh is well known for the appalling conditions under which many of its garment sector employees have to work. Both in terms of the physical conditions, but also the wages they’re paid, which are among the lowest in the region. But despite the many Australian companies that have met, or exceeded, the Australian community’s demands to improve workers’ conditions, there are still some holding out.

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Just Jeans have a response for you

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In the last week, thousands of Australians have asked Just Group a simple question: “When are you going to stop breaking hearts and sign the Bangladesh Fire and Building Safety Accord?” Their response? Not happening. Stop asking.

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Add your voice to Sumi’s and help stop the #heartbreakers

Stop the #heartbreakers

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Australians love denim. 670,000 tonnes of the stuff in 2014 alone and with a $56 billion price tag. That’s a lot of cheddar, and a whole lot of denim. For the last two years we have pressured ten of the country’s largest garment manufacturers to sign the Bangladesh Fire and Building Safety Accord — but two companies refuse to sign.

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